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A vote ‘FOR’ education

31 Oct

By ASC Past Board Chairs

PrintA SMALL STEP TOGETHER WILL BE A LARGE STEP FOR MECKLENBURG:  Why is it that all of us in Mecklenburg County should support a 1/4 penny increase in the county sales tax?  EDUCATION.  The money raised from that 1/4th of one percent increase in sales tax–from visitors, business travelers, and us–is all to be used for education of our children: Teachers’ pay, CPCC, our library system, and the arts and science education experience for all children, all schools, in Mecklenburg County.  Specifically, 80% of the revenue created will be used to enhance teachers’ compensation.  North Carolina is running for last in the country in teachers’ pay.  We do not need to run in that race. Our children and grandchildren deserve the better chance for success that they receive with better paid teachers.

20% of the revenue is allocated among– (1) Central Piedmont Community College, an educational oasis for many of our children from teens to tweens to older citizens to prepare for college and jobs and to improve their skills.  (2)  Our countywide library system which provides all of us with an extension of education and enjoyment for children and adults from “Goodnight Moon” through homework help to computer science.  (3)  The Arts & Science Council and its cultural education field trips to excite the souls of children from all our schools–public, private and charter; which have been forced to be diminished because of lack of funding.

Mecklenburg citizens have been proud of the education we provide.  Let’s stimulate our efforts again with help from those who come to our county from afar.  And remember, the 1/4th of one percent addition to sales tax does not apply to food purchases.

Let’s say “Yes” to a leap forward in Education.

Arts & Science Council Past Board Chairs

Jennifer O. Appleby
Mary Lou Babb
Amy R. Blumenthal
Robert F. Colwell
Robert Culbertson
Larry Dagenhart
Curt W. Fochtmann
Deborah Harris
Linda Lockman-Brooks
Marc E. Manly
Karl W. Newlin
Nancy K. Ostrowski
Cyndee G. Patterson
G. Patrick Phillips
Clyda S. Rent, Ph.D.
Patrick C. Riley
Marcia W. Simon
Donald K. Truslow
John R. Wester

A different Cultural Vision Plan for a different Charlotte-Mecklenburg

30 Oct

By Bernie Petit
Communications Manager

One of the imaginative artworks created by photographer Sean Busher that illustrates the Cultural Vision Plan.

One of the imaginative artworks created by photographer Sean Busher that illustrates the Cultural Vision Plan.

Everything about the 2014 countywide Cultural Vision Plan screams that it’s different from past plans, from the imaginative artworks created by photographer Sean Busher that illustrate the vision to the vision statements at the heart of the new plan.

Past plans “were very prescriptive in page after page after page of recommendations – we do this, do this, change this, stop this, do this differently,” said Arts & Science Council (ASC) President Robert Bush.

“But this time, this one is clearly a document that communicates the vision that was articulated to us here at ASC by the citizens of this community about what they want their cultural community to be.”

And, through a planning process that engaged more than 1,800 corporate and nonprofit leaders, entrepreneurs, artists and everyday citizens, the community told ASC it wants the cultural sector to:

1) Build community;
2) Increase program relevance and innovation, and;
3) Make arts, science and history central to K-12 education to ensure that Charlotte-Mecklenburg students are critical, creative thinkers.

In order to address the community’s wishes, the plan needed to re-imagine ways the cultural sector could contribute to community vitality – from enhancing our quality of life through access to programming located closer to where we live to supporting a creative and innovative workforce for the 21st century.

It does so by asking the community to “Imagine 2025” through a series of scenarios that describe what could be:

  • “Imagine If… Colonies of artists and scientists could love and work in affordable spaces that give them room to rehearse, create, invent and exhibit, welcoming the public to experience it all with them.”
  • “Imagine If… Charlotte became the destination for one of the nation’s most popular and acclaimed Fringe Festivals, celebrating challenging and innovative art and introducing the community – and the nation – to what’s next on the horizon.”
  • “Imagine If… Science sheds and clubs sprang up across Charlotte-Mecklenburg communities, where materials and equipment would be available for all aspiring Einsteins and Curies to explore and experiment.”
Robert Bush | President | Arts & Science Council

ASC President Robert Bush.

Instead of providing checklists of action items for each scenario, the vision plan instead explains what is needed to make each vision a reality, making it “an invitation for anyone and everyone to help create that future,” Bush said.

“And so, it’s not very prescriptive, it is much more this visionary invitation to the dance.”

However, it’s been said that if you give a dance, you gotta pay the band, and that reality delayed the release of the Cultural Vision Plan (completed in 2012) until a critical piece to support its vision statements could be addressed: how to find a healthy and sustainable funding model for the cultural sector.

“We finished the vision plan and it was like, we don’t have any money to do any of this so how do we put this out as ‘This is what the community wants’ and not be able to act on it?” Bush said.

That led to the formation of the Cultural Life Task Force in 2013 to examine the history and current state of the cultural sector, identify the funding challenges it faces, and establish priorities to ensure a healthy vibrant cultural community. It released its report detailing how to create a sustainable funding model to secure the cultural sector in June 2014.

There is “great alignment between what the citizens said in the vision plan and what the task force did in looking at the funding framework to balance all this out,” Bush said.

The Cultural Vision Plan, he said, is the rich, wonderful things the community wants that ASC now has to align the funding with. Work has already started, with ASC staff and board prioritizing the recommendations of the vision plan and the task force report.

There’s still much left to do, and the vision plan was created in such a manner so that its concepts could be realized in many different ways – and so that they are not just ASC’s responsibility.

“There is this shared responsibility across the entire community,” said Bush, “to listen to what Charlotte-Mecklenburg residents said they want and to try to respond in unique ways.”

Cultural Innovation Grant strikes a chord

28 Oct

By Amy Bareham
Cultural and Community Investment Intern

A Sign of the Times

A Sign of the Times of the Carolinas presents a community education program about Kwanzaa, 2013. Vocalist Toni Tupponce is pictured center. Credit: A Sign of the Times of the Carolinas.

If art is a universal language, then music is a dialect of compelling strength and influence.

Charlotte organization A Sign of the Times of the Carolinas speaks this dialect fluently, creating spaces for the celebration of performing arts, specifically those steeped in African-American culture.

Founded in 2006, A Sign of the Times of the Carolinas is championed by executive director Tyrone Jefferson and program director Toni Tupponce, both of whom are gifted musicians with a passion for exposing the heritage of their ancestors.

Recent recipients of a Knight Foundation supported Cultural Innovation Grant from ASC, the organization is endeavoring to marry Charlotte’s rhythms with its own beat, dispelling any myths surrounding its purpose.

Said Tupponce, “I want the Charlotte community to know that A Sign of the Times is so much more than a band…while we were born as a big band in Charlotte focused on the music of the African Diaspora, we have evolved into a nonprofit organization that serves the community by keeping…the people of the African diaspora alive through music, dance and spoken word.”

A Sign of the Times provides a variety of programming like its annual Bridging Musical Worlds concert on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, which takes place in the historic Excelsior Club and commemorates African-American history through a partnership with the Charlotte Symphony String Quartet.

These performances are “artistic avenues available…to tell the story of our people,” Tupponce explained. “And understand when we say ‘our people’ that crosses all kinds of color lines and ethnicities.

“Because when we start speaking of people from the African Diaspora you’re talking about everybody from Kenya to Puerto Rico to Brazil to Costa Rica to Charlotte…and all places in between.”

So what does grant funding mean for A Sign of the Times’ rich cultural tones?
“It says that the work of a small, really two person nonprofit …with a board of directors now…matters and…is of value to our community,” shared Tupponce. “And then finally it means that we have the opportunity to really step up all that we are and can be in…hoping to institutionalize A Sign of the Times of the Carolinas.

“This innovation grant helps us in terms of the resources to get that kind of thing done and to solidify the work of our board of directors in the future.”

Tupponce is most excited about the passion she sees in her board, noticeable at their first retreat which was possible through the grant as well. With plans to form a strategic growth plan and revisit their mission statement, Tupponce is certain that increased areas of leadership and leadership development are coming.

“When the board is more engaged and clear on what their roles are, then the kinds of programs that come out of that will increase,” she said.

Ralph Ellison wrote in his jazz infused classic Invisible Man, “If only all the contradictory voices shouting inside my head would calm down and sing a song in unison, whatever it was I wouldn’t care as long as they sang without dissonance.”

Tupponce recognizes the myriad of voices vying for our attention and seeks to unify them, thereby honoring life in all its syncopation. The Knight Foundation and ASC are the instruments enabling A Sign of the Times to do just that.

2014 Cato Award winner shaped by the cultural sector

28 Oct

By Bernie Petit
Communications Manager

Leslie Craven grew up in the cultural sector.

Leslie Craven.

Leslie Craven.

She participated in camps and helped usher at Children’s Theatre of Charlotte, where her mother Kathy Craven retired in 2005, and enrolled in Suzuki music lessons at the age of four at Community School of the Arts.

She took piano lessons in her neighborhood, joined the school band at Sharon Elementary and later played in the Myers Park High School orchestra and the Charlotte Youth Symphony.

The experiences gave her “a sense of normalcy that artistic expression is a big part of being a complete person,” she said.

She wants her band students at Central Academy of Technology & Arts in Union County to feel the same way. Her dedication to ensuring they leave her class as musically literate individuals that appreciate the arts is why she is one of six teachers from across the greater Charlotte region to be named 2014 Cato Excellence in Teaching Award winners.

The Cato Award honors teachers who have distinguished themselves in teaching art, science or history, or who have creatively infused art, science or history into the core curriculum.

A longtime band instructor, Craven’s philosophy is that music is for every child, music is a vehicle to teach the whole child and the music classroom is a community.

“My philosophy is very much one of a mentor,” she said. “I’m shaping the environment where the learning can happen and creativity can thrive.”

Over the years, she has set herself apart by providing differentiated instruction – along with lots of encouragement – while preparing middle and high school students to excel in concert bands, athletic bands, small ensembles and orchestras.

“It’s the aesthetic experience of creating something that’s bigger than one single person that you can share with others,” she said. “Once (students) feel that, just like in the case of me, they’re hooked.

“They may continue to play, they may just become consumers of music, or they may teach, but they can continue to get that aesthetic nourishment their entire life.”

It’s something she not only teaches, but practices as well. Craven, a clarinet player by trade, and four other Union County band instructors got together several years and formed Quintessence, a woodwind quintet that performs in the greater Charlotte area.

They started out playing for fun, but soon began performing at community functions and at local churches. They now tour about five middle and high schools each spring to perform and give a musical history presentation, making her an active contributor to the cultural sector.

It makes a difference in the classroom, she said. And it can also be traced back to the time she spent behind the scenes at Children’s Theatre and the sense of community through the arts she first experienced at Community School of the Arts.

“I think that definitely impacted my love for the arts and the way I teach,” she said. “It taught me to embrace my creativity.”

2014 Cato Award Winners

Art
Leslie Craven
, Central Academy of Technology & Arts, Union County.
Pamela Freedy, Sharon Elementary/Charlotte Preparatory School, Mecklenburg County.

Science
Darlene Petranick,
Lebanon Road Elementary, Mecklenburg County.
Bianca Yavelak, Ashbrook High School, Gaston County.

History
Megan Luzader, Ranson Middle School, Mecklenburg County.
Ann Jacob, New Town Elementary, Union County.

Vote “For” Sales Use Tax on Nov. 4

28 Oct

By Bernie Petit
Communications Manager

vote buttonTuesday, Nov. 4, is Election Day.

That means it’s your opportunity to exercise your right and stand up FOR teachers, arts and culture, libraries, and job-creation by voting FOR the Mecklenburg County Sales Use Tax referendum.

The quarter-cent sales tax increase, which does not apply to food, gas or medicine, will provide an estimated $35 million per year in additional revenue to support Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, ASC, Central Piedmont Community College and Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

The referendum, near the end of the ballot, won’t tell you it supports these organizations or how it will benefit you. That’s why we’re letting you know and asking you to vote FOR the referendum.

Mecklenburg County Sales Use Tax

The quarter-cent (1/4 of a penny) sales tax increase will support the following organizations with its estimated $35 million per year in additional revenue:

80 percent to Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools to keep and recruit great teachers and staff for our children

7.5 percent to Central Piedmont Community College to hire and retain the best faculty and staff for students

7.5 percent to the Arts & Science Council to strengthen arts, science and history programs and organizations

5 percent to Charlotte Mecklenburg Library to provide 21st century library services

For more information, visit http://www.Together4Meck.com.

A Small Step Together Will Be a Large Step for Mecklenburg

Why is it that all of us in Mecklenburg County should support a 1/4 penny increase in the county sales tax?  EDUCATION.  The money raised from that 1/4th of one percent increase in sales tax–from visitors, business travelers, and us–is all to be used for education of our children: Teachers’ pay, CPCC, our library system, and the arts and science education experience for all children, all schools, in Mecklenburg County.  Specifically, 80% of the revenue created will be used to enhance teachers’ compensation.  North Carolina is running for last in the country in teachers’ pay.  We do not need to run in that race. Our children and grandchildren deserve the better chance for success that they receive with better paid teachers.

20% of the revenue is allocated among– (1) Central Piedmont Community College, an educational oasis for many of our children from teens to tweens to older citizens to prepare for college and jobs and to improve their skills.  (2)  Our countywide library system which provides all of us with an extension of education and enjoyment for children and adults from “Goodnight Moon” through homework help to computer science.  (3)  The Arts & Science Council and its cultural education field trips to excite the souls of children from all our schools–public, private and charter; which have been forced to be diminished because of lack of funding.

Mecklenburg citizens have been proud of the education we provide.  Let’s stimulate our efforts again with help from those who come to our county from afar.  And remember, the 1/4th of one percent addition to sales tax does not apply to food purchases.

Let’s say “Yes” to a leap forward in Education.

By Arts & Science Council Past Board Chairs

Jennifer O. Appleby
Mary Lou Babb
Amy R. Blumenthal
Robert F. Colwell
Robert Culbertson
Larry Dagenhart
Curt W. Fochtmann
Deborah Harris
Linda Lockman-Brooks
Marc E. Manly
Karl W. Newlin
Nancy K. Ostrowski
Cyndee G. Patterson
G. Patrick Phillips
Clyda S. Rent, Ph.D.
Patrick C. Riley
Marcia W. Simon
Donald K. Truslow
John R. Wester

Candidates Share Their Views on the Cultural Sector

In advance of the 2014 election, ASC asked candidates to complete questionnaires to learn about how they view the cultural sector. You can read their responses below:

Mecklenburg Board of County Commission candidates

North Carolina State Legislature candidates

When and Where to Vote

For a list of voting locations, click here.

 

Crushing on CLT art

24 Oct

By Amy Bareham
Community & Cultural Investment Intern

For many, art seems to resemble an awkward first date.

We sit down with a painting or a novel, a poem or an opera and we try. We listen, we observe, we ask the obligatory introspective questions about ourselves and the work, but then art gets a little too demanding. She – or he, for that matter – asks that we enter into a relationship in which we appreciate art, recognize and love it, support and perpetuate it. And that can be a little overwhelming for someone just getting into the dating scene. So we walk out of museums, theaters and parks reassuring art that it isn’t her or him, no really, it’s us.

Dulce Tavares.

Dulce Tavares.

But what if there were people creating art locally – the kind of art that meets us exactly where we are and fits naturally into our lives. Would we give an art romance a second chance?
Shareholders in the Arts & Science Council’s Fall 2014 Community Supported Art (CSA) program are excited about their growing relationship with art and so is one of CSA’s local artists, Dulce Tavares.

Originally a professor of microbiology and immunology in her native country of Brazil, Tavares moved to the U.S. and decided it was time to do something she’d always enjoyed.

“I started making murals and doing all sorts of stuff,” she said. “Then I just chose a mixed media to work with. That is really rewarding because it gives you a lot of possibilities to create.”

Twenty years later, Tavares is making a name for herself in the Charlotte community, mostly due to word of mouth. She attributes her success to commissions from “prestigious places like Charlotte Latin School,” but hasn’t strayed far from her professorial roots. A teacher at the Behailu academy, a nonprofit organization with an after-school program for high school and middle school students, SOAR academy for homeschoolers, and a teaching artist with the Harvey Gantt Center, she is helping others fall in love with the accessibility of art.
Much of her work is influenced by Latin American flair.

“Brazil is a multi-cultural country. We have artists from all around the world – from Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, so this gives to the country and the people a rich culture,” she explained. “There are many popular artists and they make very colorful paintings. I always was intrigued and really liked that kind of art…I always liked to represent what I’m seeing the best I can.

“The Brazilian art really influences me with all those colors…they are not afraid of color and try different combinations.”

An example of Dulce Tavares' artwork.

An example of Dulce Tavares’ artwork.

CSA shareholders will experience these combinations in papier-mâché plant sculptures made from recyclable materials, another trademark of Tavares’ pieces.

“I’m forcing my creativity to do something that doesn’t represent the reality…this is why I call them alien plants because they are something imaginary…I’m getting inspiration sometimes in nature but I’m just giving my interpretation,” she said.

Tavares is hoping that working with recycled materials will encourage her students, too.

“I think that is a good lesson to teach them…try to use what they have around, available, and transform something that could be trashed into a nice piece of art.”

For those of you burned by many first art dates gone wrong, Tavares’ art may be just the right breath of fresh air.

Enjoy a cultural treat this Halloween

21 Oct

Compiled by Bernie Petit
Communications Manager

pumpkin_categoryYou don’t have to wait for Halloween to enjoy some great cultural treats.

You can get dressed up or go as yourself to one or more Halloween-themed cultural haunts.

From a haunted trail at Historic Latta Plantation to a marvelous, luminescent reality courtesy of Charlotte’s Omimeo Mime Theatre, there are plenty of cultural events to get you in the Halloween spirit.

No tricks.

Ghost Walk – A Haunted Trail
When: Oct. 24-25.
Where: Historic Latta Plantation, 5225 Sample Road, Charlotte.
What’s Happening: Travel through the plantation at night to venture past an explosive Civil War battlefield, survive a soldiers’ cemetery, escape a ghostly prison camp and enjoy being frightened all in the spirit of Halloween. This haunted-trail type of attraction is not recommended for young children.
Cost: $10.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441880244/Ghost_Walk_A_Haunted_Trail

The Duke Mansion’s “Homeland” Halloween Party
When: Oct. 25.
Where: Duke Mansion, 400 Hermitage Road, Charlotte.
What’s Happening: Expect great food, live music, and a chance to blow your cover at the historic mansion known as Vice President William Walden’s home on the television series “Homeland.” Sneak into the mansion for gourmet food and hush-hush tunes from the house band, Bad Daddies. Bid on trips, jewelry and other delights at the silence auction, or take a tour of the historic mansion.
Cost: $75 per person ($25 is tax-deductible).
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441874787/The_Duke_Mansions_Homeland_Halloween_Party

Halloween at the Haven
When: Oct. 25.
Where: Wing Haven, 248 Ridgewood Ave., Charlotte.
What’s Happening: A spooky Saturday in the Wing Haven Garden where children will make a wonderful fall centerpiece with a pumpkin and pansies in addition to a spooky sweet craft, wander the garden paths for a scavenger hunt, and hear ghost stories at a secret gathering spot in the woods. Later, participants will decorate goblin-friendly cookies with refreshments to share. Dress in costume (optional) and for the weather. Limited availability, early registration encouraged. Bring two cans of non-perishable food items for Second Harvest Food Bank and receive a $5 gift voucher good for a future family program at Wing Haven.
Cost: $8 per child non-member, $5 per child Wing Haven member.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441879129/Halloween_at_the_Haven

Zombie Survival Weekend
When: Oct. 24-25
Where: Discovery Place Education Studio, 300 N Poplar St., Charlotte.
What’s Happening: If the zombie apocalypse happened today, would you be ready? Go beyond Hollywood depictions with our hands-on training sessions, designed to teach you the skills and science you’ll need to know to defend yourself against the walking dead.
Cost: Sessions start at $50
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441879617/Zombie_Survival_Weekend

Visuween – An Epic Halloween Extravaganza of Monstrous Proportions
When: Oct. 31.
Where: Visulite Theatre, 1615 Elizabeth Ave., Charlotte.
What’s Happening: A night of music inspired by bands like Muse (Ish), The Killers (S.O.Stereo), The Yeah Yeah Yeahs (Grown Up Avenger Stuff), Jack White (The Waves), Queens of the Stone Age (Semi-Pro), The Strokes (The Business People), Faith No More (Dr Cirkustien) and more.
Cost: Free.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441878207/Visuween_An_Epic_Halloween_Extravaganza_of_Monstrous_Proportions

Spirits of Rosedale
When: Oct 24-Nov. 1.
Where: Historic Rosedale Plantation, 3427 North Tryon St., Charlotte.
What’s Happening: The Spirits of Rosedale takes visitors on a night tour through the plantation home’s first floor, kitchen basement, and gardens. Rosedale’s living history team presents this family-friendly Halloween program appropriate for audiences ages 6 and up.
Cost: $15, advance tickets available.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441864604/Spirits_of_Rosedale

omimeo-blm-hd-v3_categoryOmimeo’s Black Light Magic: Halloween Dream
When: Oct. 24-Nov. 1.
Where: ImaginOn: The Joe & Joan Martin Center
What’s Happening: Join Charlotte’s Omimeo Mime Theatre for a marvelous, luminescent reality, full of crazy characters, unusual illusions and spectacular special effects. Follow the story of a young trick-or-treater as she magically travels from her bedroom to a fantastical world of dreams, masks and haunting images — with just the right amount of Halloween chills. Wear your Halloween costume, fluorescent or white clothes and you’ll really be part of the show.
Cost: $14.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441868116/Omimeos_Black_Light_Magic_Halloween_Dream

Myers Park Library Presents: Children’s Pumpkin Party
When: Oct. 31.
Where: Myers Park Library, 1361 Queens Road, Charlotte.
What’s Happening: Throw on your costume* for a fun-filled hour of stories, songs, and games! Children will also make a take home craft and each will receive a treat bag. This program is best for school-age children. Registration is required.
*Costumes are not required, however, if costumes are worn, please make sure they are kid-friendly.
Cost: Free.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441873118/Myers_Park_Library_Presents_Childrens_Pumpkin_Party

Midnight in the Garden
When: Oct. 31-Nov. 1.
Where: Historic Rosedale Plantation, 3427 N. Tryon St., Charlotte.
What’s Happening: Hear the real tales and ghost stories of encounters and experiences of Historic Rosedale staff and volunteers since 2006. Contact will be attempted in the garden. Who will you hear this night? Who will tap you on the shoulder? What will you see? Please wear flat, quite comfortable shoes and bring a small twist top flashlight. Be prepared to sit on the grass.
Cost: $20.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441873162/Midnight_in_the_Garden

Paranormal Encounter
When: Oct. 31-Nov. 1.
Where: Historic Rosedale, 3427 N. Tryon St., Charlotte.
What’s Happening: Join professional ghost hunters as they take no more than 8 guests through all 4 floors of Rosedale’s 200 year old plantation house, and attempt contact with the beyond. You will use the latest technology in partnership with the Charlotte Area Paranormal Society. Their team will lead the investigation. Please wear flat, quiet comfortable shoes and bring a small twist top flashlight. You never know what you may find… or what may find you.
Cost: $65.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441873172/Paranormal_Encounter

Hoot and Howl – Day of the Dead
When: Nov. 1.
Where: Carolina Raptor Center,
What’s Happening: Held on the traditional Dia de Los Muertos, the Carolina Raptor Center be remembering extinct species with Calaveras (poems/epitaphs), making paper flowers, engaging in traditional face painting and exploring the sugar skull tradition. The event will also include some traditional Halloween games and crafts including a costume contest, pumpkin painting, trick or treating and making paper plate skeletons.
Cost: $10 adults, $8 students, free for children 4 and under.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441875889/Hoot_and_Howl_Day_of_the_Dead

Day of the Dead/Dia de los Muertos
When: Nov. 2.
Where: Levine Museum of the New South, 200 E. Seventh St., Charlotte.
What’s Happening: The annual free family festival celebrates the traditional Mexican holiday, Day of the Dead/Dia de los Muertos, with food, music, arts, crafts, altars and more. Presented in partnership with the Latin American Coalition. It’s not a Halloween event, but it’s an awesome event you won’t want to miss.
Cost: Free.
Details: http://www.charlottecultureguide.com/event/detail/441879712/Day_of_the_DeadDia_de_los_Muertos

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